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It's somewhat daunting to write on The Brothers Karamazov. Reviewing the events of the text, I seem to remember most of it and understood it a great deal. There's still a small devil in the back of my mind saying that I must have forgotten something or not read something the exact right way. It's a long book with a ton of things happening and demands an active role in reading it. Some background knowledge on the social state of Russia in the late 19th century also helps. There's characters aplenty and, in true Dostoyevsky fashion, everyone has something to say and then something else and, always, something even more.

My fear is that even touching the issue would cause me more self-laceration for feeling like I was doing the book a disservice. There are a ton of things to consider in the text and it is all worth the scrutiny. The Brothers Karamazov is a masterpiece of a novel. It's not just a book on the power forgiveness has on the human soul, the relationship between God and man, the nature of the Christian faith, or the dangers present in 19th century Russia as new ideas, dangerous ideas, entered the old land of the Tsars. It's also a crime thriller about a supremely dysfunctional family headed by the king buffoon Fyodor Karamazov who sired three sons and a bastard. Dimitri the eldest is led by passion and speech making, Ivan the second brother is an intellectual and cold to his family, Alyosha the third a kindhearted young man married to his faith, and Smerdyakov the bastard is a cruel wretch keen on his own ego. A courtroom scene at the end is a highlight as well with the provisional prosecutor squaring off against a big city lawyer from Petersburg arguing like the devil and angel on our shoulders. This book can be enjoyed on so many levels it's almost absurd.

The Idiot, the last Dostoyevsky novel I read, was plagued by awful pacing and too many characters with not enough to do. There is none of either in The Brothers Karamazov. Dostoyevsky also helps the reader out mentioning some detail about a character not heard of in two hundred or three hundred pages. Quite simply, it's a trim book. There's very little fat with each chapter mattering to the plot and the questions Dostoyevsky is asking whereas The Idiot could have had an entire subplot removed with so little consequence to the overall plot.

Aside from my reading pursuits, life seems to be on the up and up. Finally picked a destination for my life and now I can work towards it, just gotta take that first step. Been really wanting to get back into writing again. I'd like to actually pen a story worth paying money for. Give me something to wake up for.
  • Listening to: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VGvHnDeS12o
  • Reading: The Campaigns of Alexander by Arrian

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popov89
Fisher
Artist | Hobbyist | Literature
United States
Most of my stories are silly one off pieces about some magical land influenced by my limited knowledge of Scottish myth.
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It's somewhat daunting to write on The Brothers Karamazov. Reviewing the events of the text, I seem to remember most of it and understood it a great deal. There's still a small devil in the back of my mind saying that I must have forgotten something or not read something the exact right way. It's a long book with a ton of things happening and demands an active role in reading it. Some background knowledge on the social state of Russia in the late 19th century also helps. There's characters aplenty and, in true Dostoyevsky fashion, everyone has something to say and then something else and, always, something even more.

My fear is that even touching the issue would cause me more self-laceration for feeling like I was doing the book a disservice. There are a ton of things to consider in the text and it is all worth the scrutiny. The Brothers Karamazov is a masterpiece of a novel. It's not just a book on the power forgiveness has on the human soul, the relationship between God and man, the nature of the Christian faith, or the dangers present in 19th century Russia as new ideas, dangerous ideas, entered the old land of the Tsars. It's also a crime thriller about a supremely dysfunctional family headed by the king buffoon Fyodor Karamazov who sired three sons and a bastard. Dimitri the eldest is led by passion and speech making, Ivan the second brother is an intellectual and cold to his family, Alyosha the third a kindhearted young man married to his faith, and Smerdyakov the bastard is a cruel wretch keen on his own ego. A courtroom scene at the end is a highlight as well with the provisional prosecutor squaring off against a big city lawyer from Petersburg arguing like the devil and angel on our shoulders. This book can be enjoyed on so many levels it's almost absurd.

The Idiot, the last Dostoyevsky novel I read, was plagued by awful pacing and too many characters with not enough to do. There is none of either in The Brothers Karamazov. Dostoyevsky also helps the reader out mentioning some detail about a character not heard of in two hundred or three hundred pages. Quite simply, it's a trim book. There's very little fat with each chapter mattering to the plot and the questions Dostoyevsky is asking whereas The Idiot could have had an entire subplot removed with so little consequence to the overall plot.

Aside from my reading pursuits, life seems to be on the up and up. Finally picked a destination for my life and now I can work towards it, just gotta take that first step. Been really wanting to get back into writing again. I'd like to actually pen a story worth paying money for. Give me something to wake up for.
  • Listening to: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VGvHnDeS12o
  • Reading: The Campaigns of Alexander by Arrian

Critiques

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:iconknofear:
KnoFear Featured By Owner Aug 29, 2014  Student Writer
Happy birthday!
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(1 Reply)
:icondefinitivecontent:
DefinitiveContent Featured By Owner Jul 28, 2014
Thanks for the read and fave. I noticed you wrote about Cat's Cradle. I have a piece that was partly inspired by it. At least the title was and one of the underpinning themes. It's called House of Hope and Mercy. 
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:iconnomadicmusic:
NomadicMusic Featured By Owner Feb 10, 2014  Hobbyist Photographer
Thank you for the favorite!
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:icondarkness-melody:
Darkness-Melody Featured By Owner Feb 2, 2014
Thank you for faving my poem "The Tale of Tamas Lin". If you have an comments or critique, please do share.
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:icondeathlesslegends13:
DeathlessLegends13 Featured By Owner Dec 17, 2013  Student Writer
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